Around the World in 1 week rekindling.

Yes yes I know it’s been a while, sorry if I was off on a pilgrimage. Before I left I announced the launch of an event called Around The World in One Week. The response was great and I felt like it was completely possible.

Then I went on a pilgrimage.

Now I’m back and able to restart it! Many people have already sent me emails with extracts from their times travelling around the world and I thank you for that, but, if you believe that you have any piece that is suitable for this challenge, please, get in touch with me. We need as many people as possible to cover as much ground as we can, but this is a community project! If you haven’t got a clue what i’m blabbering on about you can find all information on previous posts, but please, get involved!

This will only be as good as you make it!
Wow. Deep.

If you want to reach me, here’s my email: ejdawes@talktalk.net

-Elliot

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Project Camino: Part I of V

PART ONE: ORIGINS

All stories have origins. Wether or not they happen in a particularly epic manner or not is a different manner. For me, the start of my 260km trek through Spain didn’t start with a vision in a burning bush, or a visit from the ghost of Christmas past, or a paranormal entity crawling out of my TV, but walking out of a cinema, 99p Chicken Mayo burger in hand.

“I’m just saying, sometimes it’s better to not know where you’re going. When was the last time you went on an actual adventure?”
This was the kind of thing we usually talked about, my dad and I, when out together. His mundane collection of maps annoyed me. My mundane approach of adventure and wandering blindly annoyed him. What was planned there and then may, or may not have been to put these theories to the test. My Dad, who had remained silent now offered his thoughts. “Have you ever heard of the Camino?”

Well, me being a sixteen year old obviously hadn’t. I knew about the burger, and munched on it silently. What was a Camino? It sounded like a species of Piranha.
I did have the guts to Google it when we got home. “WHAT! THAT’S A WALK, A LONG ONE!”. I hadn’t really known much about how long walks usually were, as the average duration for me was fifteen minutes down to the local Tesco to get a jumbo chocolate croissant in the morning (85p, in case you’re wondering, i’d recommend).
260km would be our distance, restricted by time.
That and my fitness.
Oh, and the sleeping arrangements.

I didn’t know this at the time, but hostels are not that comfortable. I was given a description, but nothing could prepare me for the living conditions. In fact, nothing could have prepared me for any of it. The walking, early hours, coffee, massive sandwiches, annoying birds and snoring women. All of which I experienced. But I did try to prepare.

Climbing Mt Snowdon, the numerous hikes, early starts and aching all played their part in my year long training so I would simply be able to finish. I do live in England though, so I don’t have the heat. Scorched earth beating down on you without any shade for hours as your lips dry and water depletes. You wage a constant war with the equilibrium of energy and sleep.

But I like a challenge. I like seeing what I can actually do, how far I can push myself.

After all, how bad could it be?

-Elliot

High Plain Lake Miniques, Atacama Region, Chile.

This breathtaking, jaw-dropping photo was submitted by Lucy from Around the World.
It shows Laguna Miniques, a high plain (altiplano) lake in the Atacama region in northern Chile. Laguna Miniques is located in the south-east of the city San Pedro de Atacama.
The lake is part of the Los Flamencos National Reserve.

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Valley of the Moon, Atacama Desert, Chile.

This amazing valley is called Valle de la Luna for a reason. And the reason is obvious: This place looks like an otherworldly area in a Sci-Fi movie.

This extraordinary photo was sent in by Lucy from Around the World. Lucy is a 19-year-old student of the beautiful French language and German. She is based in London, UK, but currently travelling South America during her summer holidays.

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Vikos Gorge, Epirus, Greece.

This absolutely stunning photograph was submitted by Vasilios from Traveller’s Tree. It shows the Vikos Gorge in the region of Epirus in northern Greece.
Vikos Gorge is situated in the Pindus Mountains, and is listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the deepest gorge in the world in proportion to its width.

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Beach in Cullera, Spain.

This old-school postcard-style photograph was sent in by Anuja from My_Endeavors. It shows a beach in Cullera near Valencia in Spain.
Anuja is a 21-year-old college student from the Bay Area near San Francisco (USA).

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